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that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
might say was bittersweet to me because i knew dr. king, i knew him the last two years of his life and i am bitter because of the way that he was taken from us because of hatred in this country. i guess we can start at the beginning because the beginning of the but you were on the mall with dr. king and near the end you are near the mall again 50 years later with a monument that you helped design. >> guest: in between coming back so many times on different occasions to the mall, so it seems like a i lived in washington a short time that had a symbolic meaning for my life and sentimental. every time i come back i have all these memories. >> host: it's a beautiful city. you were 19-years-old in 1963. you were on the mall. the march on washington where dr. king gave that iconic address, i have a dream. how did you happen to go there? >> guest: part of it is i grew up in a small town where there weren't many black people. i think there were three black families growing up in los alamos. so i'd always been fascinated by what was the black community like? i didn't have very much exposure to it
your life and cover new insights as a historian from the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you? >> guest: it is the 50th anniversary and it is 50 years of mine life of the king legacy and to my coming of age. part of it was to do the to tasks. that my life had been connected to the keying legacy -- king legacy and how king impacted me and i was involved with this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> host: it is an excellent reid and we are of the same generation and i was also coming of age. it was bittersweet because i knew dr. king he was my mentor. but bitter because the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred. we can start at the beginning the kids you're on the mall with dr. king and at the end you were there again with 50 years later with the monument you help to design. >> guest: and coming back for important occasions. i only lived in washington a short time but the mall had a great symbolic meaning and sentimental. >> host: it is a beautiful city. 19 years ago, the march on washington where he gave the speech i have a dream. how di
as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me. and how i got involved in this journey of editing kinks papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you and i are of the same generation and i too was coming-of-age in the 60s. and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess week because they knew dr. came. he was my mentor and i knew in the last two years of my life in bitter because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i guess we can start at the beginning he caused at the beginning of your book you are run the mall with dr. came and ere the end of your book you are on the mall again 50 year
: sorry. it's okay, jon. look, as long as we're celebrating dr. king's birthday, i would like to make one request. can we as a nation please, please stop using martin luther king as a prop in our own petty political arguments >> jon: you mean about race? no, jon. about everything. listen to what the chairman of national gun appreciation day said last week >> i believe gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think he would agree with me if he were alive today. >> let me stop you right there. he is not alive today. now what was it that killed him? i don't know, jon. was it diabetes? >> jon: i don't think so sandwich choke maybe? mauled by lions on the porch of a memphis hotel? i don't know. >> jon: i don't think that was it >> you were talking about dr. king. >> he would agree with me if he were alive today. that if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> slavery wouldn't have been a chapter. it would have been oppressive. followed by the chapter en
appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think he would agree with me if he were alive today. >> let me stop you right there. he is not alive today. now what was it that killed him? i don't know, jon. was it diabetes? >> jon: i don't think so sandwich choke maybe? mauled by lions on the porch of a memphis hotel? i don't know. >> jon: i don't think that was it >> you were talking about dr. king. >> he would agree with me if he were alive today. that if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> slavery wouldn't have been a chapter. it would have been oppressive. followed by the chapter entitled all the black people are dead. now who is going to build the country? >> jon: you believe martin luther king would have favored gun control >> absolutely yes jon: why would you say that? on second thought, no, he wouldn't snop okay. why would you say that? >> wait, wait. yeah, he would. i'm just [bleep] with you, jon. i have no idea. how am i supposed to know? dr. king
which dr. king could not resist, and lyndon johnson couldn't. they were constantly being pushed from below by people who wanted action. johnson becomes president on november 22, 1963. he is an accidental president. he had been in the backwaters of the vice-presidency. heed been drinking too much. he was fat. he was unhappy. he was cantankerous, and he was a forgotten man. martin luther king, on that day, faced a crisis of his own. the civil rights legislation that john f. kennedy finally introduced in june of '63, pushed by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured
the federal government for enacting their own laws. dr. king didn't arrest the state people, he was arrested by them. you're saying the feds are illegal and we want the right to arrest them. that is unking-like. >> you're sounding a little bit like piers morgan screaming at me. >> oh, well, let me say it more silently. you're sounding unking-life. >> the point i'm trying to make is understood, clearly, that the state and the federal government and the ever-increasing authority. and that was unnecessary. >> and that's why you protested states' rights. and what we're saying is the states have a sovereign role here. and the sovereign role is this. if the president of the united states doesn't get it to empower himself with the second amendment says. the states have a role. >> martin luther king said that he was protesting in his famous speech of 50 years ago that concluded with i have a dream. that he was protesting to governors whose lips were drifting with the words of nullification. i'm glad you're using king as if model because it is the antithesis for what you're saying. let me show you wh
dr. king's with president obama. but earlier, it was that speech. and he defied expectations again. there were specifics on voting, on gay rights, on women's rights, on climate change, on immigration, on gun control. and he defended the big three entitlements. joining me now is democratic senator from ohio, broun. what a speech. how surprised were you at the tone and the specifics in this speech? >> i wasn't surprised. i mean, we had very high expectations for him. he delivered. i loved the line as barney frank and others mentioned from seneca falls to selma to stonewall and i think that says a couple things. it says, one, how we've moved forward as a nation and we should acknowledge that at the inauguration. and, second, it underscores how none of those were easy. you know everything about civil rights and what happens with women's rights and what happens with gay rights. it's always a battle tomorrow that starts. and the president, i like how he is engaged with organizing for action. and i like how he knows that the country is behind him but needs to remind the congress that it's
a national day of service. [cheers and applause] and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question -- what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. but there are as many right answers as there are people in this tent today and people in our country. eva spoke about how her parents inspired her. my parents certainly inspire me every day. but today, when i engaged in a service project with my husband mark, i will be thinking about my grandmother dorothy who started giving back when she was a child. she volunteered in her local school, helping to tutor migrant workers, farm children in southern california, in reading in english and writing. as she got older and had her own children, she provided school trips. she always wanted to cook an extra lunch for someone whose parents could not provide that for them. when she got older still, her children, including my mom, had left the home. she became a big sister to mentor young girls like her who had been neglected and abused as a c
, as the parade makes its way past. barack obama and the presidency, the realization of the dual dream of dr. king and abraham lincoln. he'll be using those two bibles when he takes the public oath of office, again, all leading to a remarkable day here on the national mall. overnight, the president attended the first event of his second term, a candlelight reception. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. >> reporter: where he addressed the issue everyone in washington has been discussing. >> i love michelle obama. to address the most significant event of this weekend, i love her bangs. >> reporter: hours earlier, at the white house, the second term began, as he took the oath of office, in a private ceremony. the influx of spectators who descended upon washington, to watch obama be sworn in a second time. >> the theme of this year's inauguration, is our people, our future. >> reporter: while the president plans to look to the future, he'll also pay tribute to the past. he'll be sworn in on two bibles. one used by abraham lincoln. an
of service. [ cheers and applause ] >> and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question. what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. >> chelsea clinton there speaking at the national day of service. monday isn't just inauguration day. also happens to be martin luther king jr. day. and we'll hear from his daughter bernice and find out why she says president obama's second term is actually even more important than the first one. >>> for 29-year-old pushp pushpa basnit, 2013 fleas begins on a high note. she was named cnn hero of the year for her work providing a home for children of incarcerated parents in nepal. i sat down with her after the big moment. how do you feel? you've just won. >> i think i'm dreaming. it's a big honor for me. i will never forget this night in my life. >> what was going through your mind when you were walking up on stage? >> we all are winners, definitely. i've seen my dream come true. thank you very much. i'm still -- definitely this is going
there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will arche some words that martine some more of the martin said and the march i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read
his legacy live on. i'll have more on dr. king's legacy coming up later in the show. but first, we want to show you -- we want to share your thoughts about dr. king, about his dream on our facebook page. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and like us to join the conversation that's going long after the show ends. if by blessed you mean freaked out about money well we suddenly noticed that everything was getting more expensive so we switched to the bargain detergent but i found myself using three times more than you're supposed to and the clothes still weren't as clean as with tide. so we're back to tide. they're cuter in clean clothes. thanks honey yeah you suck at folding [ laughs ] [ female announcer ] one cap of tide gives you more cleaning power than 6 caps of the bargain brand. [ woman ] that's my tide, what's yours? five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn fro
of the president talking about a conversations you had with dr. martin luther king and of course tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day. i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. but in those conversations with martin luther king, he felt there may be an african-american president, the first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> it's -- that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country. that we are growing up. >> and how do you think the president -- >> we are moving beyond ignorance. >> right. how do you think. >> sorry? >> how do you think he's done, president obama, in the first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he could. i think that there were number of people who as soon as he was elected put their feet down in -- their heels in to the earth and said, no matter what he does, no matter how good he is, i will not support him. i will resist his attempts to make our country better. i think that he was -- i think he was sur
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealous. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
ago, that dr. king stood on the steps of the lincoln memorial and said i have a dream. >> of course, this was actually the fourth time that president obama has taken the oath of office. let's bring in our panel, van jones, cnn contributor who served as president obama's green jobs adviser in 2009. sally quinn, margaret hoover, republican consultant, cornell belcher, democratic strategist who served fas a pollster for president obama's 2012 re-election team. i wonder how you think this anniversary, this martin luther king day, informed and was infused throughout president obama's remarks today. >> i'll go back to even when he was senator obama. he always talked about, he also understood the gravity and talked about, i stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we
's bible and the bible of dr. king as well on inauguration ceremony. and i always think of that as sort of, a cycle, right, in a way, a virtuous cycle, martin luther king jr., assassinated trying to create what i think to some may be small degree, has been realized in the election and inauguration the first black president of this country. >> well, you know, with the first election, i along with so many other people just broke down and cried and cried and cried. out of thankfulness, out of remembering what we had been through. and thinking about medgar and all those other people who gave their lives and gave so much that we don't even recognize any more. and hopefully, will begin to do that in the very, very near future. >> myrlie evers-williams, we're looking forward to your three minutes, we can't wait. >> so am i. >> so great to see you. >>> so a man who marched alongside martin luther king jr. during the civil rights era, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to him in just a moment. >> we're going to talk about what this inauguration means for him and also the challen
>>> up next on a second look, celebrating the life of dr. martin luther king and remembering the dark days of 1968 when americans saw not one but two great hopes for the nation assassinated. >>> also a white man raised in the segregated south with a lifetime dedicated to racial equality. >>> one small act of defiance led to one great movement for dignity. how the nation remembered rosa parks as she was laid to rest. >>> plus a look at great speeches that made an impact on history. >>> tomorrow is the day we celebrate the life of martin luther king jr. an event that shook the nation to its foundation and brought civil rights to the forefront of that year's presidential campaign. a gunman would assassinate reverent king then two months later, robert f. kennedy was shot and killed on the night he won the california primary. george watson brought us this report back in 1988. 20 years after the king assassination. >> like anybody i would like to live a long life, longevity has its place. but i'm not concerned about that now. i just want to do god's will. and he's allowed me to go
. >> bob: it's remarkable coon dense it would fall the same day as dr. king's, the marked anniversary of dr. king, who in my view was probably one of the greatest human beings that walked the face of the earth. i say that also i'm sorry to my dad who worked with dr. king was not here to see first the black president get elected but to see and hear that, people forget how quickly and powerfully martin luther king organized the black community and brought great process. the right thing to say. >> kimberly: wouldn't martin luther king be proud to see how far we have come as a country, electing a black president not once but twice. >> bob: he's looking down and seeing it. >> kimberly: civil rights with the president. let's listen to what the president had to say and then we'll get reaction. freddie talk about kimberly. >> dana: i like your red dress. >> kimberly: you like it? >> it's not complete until our mothers and daughters earn a living equal to the efforts. [ applause ] our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are
conversation with the desk clerk, really funny. i said is there a dr. king staying at the hotel? in spanish. he wants to try his english out on me. king? how do you say that in spanish? i said ray. he said i will do the spanish in english. [speaking spanish] >> for whom that is -- one time we had -- we never had a king. i said his name is king. you said dr. king. the doctor thing, forget the king. just look at the register. i had 480 more hotels to call -- maybe. and he looks at the register and it says kingo. he had to put an o on their somehow. i said really? yes. it is better in spanish. [speaking spanish] >> in spanish a black uncle and we say a black guy. so funny using the word in that context. his last words, running out the door, around the corner down to the castillo, almost like crossing the new jersey turnpike which is one of my other books, the new jersey turnpike and the native new yorker i am dodging traffic like crazy and get to the hotel and picked up the phone in the lobby and say will you connect me with his room and picks up the phone and says hello? he was exhausted. he had
owned by dr. king on the very day the country marks the civil rights' speaker's birthday. >> a democracy by way of inauguration. remembering king is one of those americans who helped the democracy. >> martin luther king teh third. cameras ever were capturing the moment. -- were there capturing the moment. >> there were people of all races, all nationalities holding hands. >> that day she purchased this metal. today, she wore it. >> it is a dream that is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> she is here from virginia. she can to president obama's first inauguration and could not miss this one. >> the second one is just as memorable and historic. >> she would like to think it is the hand of god that allowed the presidential inauguration and this day to fall on teh same day. >> it is a historic event. we are thrilled to be here. >> it was her first time at kings memorial, an important site she said, especially for her kids and future generations. >> this is very emotional. i live long enough to see this. >> the memorial, the inauguration -- a pledge of people old enough to
dreams. >> the historian there on dr. king and his legacy. monday, we will bring you live coverage throughout the day. president obama gets sworn and for his second term in office. for all of us, thank you for watching and have a good weekend. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
. okay, but you met dr. martin luther king, jr. it was kind of an unexpected meeting because the first job was at a radio station. you were doing the traffic and -- . >> yes, i was working the black operated programs. he was a friend of our national salesmen, when wasn't there to do an event. he was there to it is and relax and find a moment to be quiet and i was the traffic manager. i kept the commercials going and i always worked late so i was there at night. he would come occasionally to visit his frienders frank clark and i would almost always be there and the single day was when frank walked in with dr. king and he said you nomar tin, don't new i said no, i don't nomar tin. of course there were many occasions where i covered him on actual events. >> >> and you said you were on the phone with bill, your husband, right? >> yes. >> you said bill, you will never guess who is here! >> yes. [ laughing ] >> martin luther king talked about a dream. >> he did. >> you have never in my wildest dream in the book. and there are people now who have dream to do things. maybe their dreams ha
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
honoring dr. king. >> check out this video shot hours ago by sky 7 hd. that is a surfer near the cliff house. >> strong rip currents caused the surfer to lose his bearings. the coast guard first thought of air lifting him but then decided on a different approach. they told the surfer to jump into the water and jim against crashing waves to rescuers. >> shouldn't have been as far as i was with my buddy. he was a more advanced surfer. called whoever needed to call, and they came, saved me. >> the surfer taken to the pier and checked out by paramedic autos the body of one man was recovered and the search continues for another presumed drowned off the north shore of the island of kuaui. he was vacationing with his friends, leaving a farewell to san francisco as last post, here you can see it on his facebook page. he died trying to save his friend, brian baker are who was swept into the ocean. the search for baker resumed today. >> police are investigating a deadly early morning shooting that devastated a family this, happened just after midnight. a 43-year-old was shot to death. his police
in abraham lincoln's inauguration another belonging to dr. martin luther king jr. who we honor today. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did
and the other to dr. king. >> it is our generation's task to carry on what those pioneers began? in his inaugural address the president gave vision. >> we are true to our creed when a little girl born into poverty knows she has the same chance to succeed as might be else. >> he touched on taxes, gun control and immigration. he urged cooperation in washington. >> congress requires us to act in our time. >> after the ceremony the president turned to take one last look at the view. later he signed documents nominating his cabinet members. senator majority leader harry reid toasted the president. the president thanked all in attendance. >> i recognize that democracy is not always easy. i recamiers there are profound differences in this room. but i just want to saw thank you for your service. >> the day concluded with a one and a half mile parade to the white house. the president and the first lady walked a portion of the route. tonight they will attend two inaugural balls. >> reporter: talking to some bay area residents told us that seeing him sworn th
everything happening, you know, right now with the 50 50th anniversary of dr. king's speech with the 150th 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation, it's amazing. i think it's great. >> i find it so fitting for the second inauguration of this administration and for what our country needs today. >> this is history. it will always be in the history books. no one can take it away. >> reporter: and beverly mckinseys living proof of the dream realized. >> you as an individual have the opportunity to make a difference in this world and if you don't do that, it was all nor naught. >> reporter: a message these former californians say inspire their families, their son won an award for academics excellence. >> i tell my son strive for the best, maybe you can be the first hispanic. >> and that was christin ayers reporting and she is among the hundreds of thousands streaming into the nation's capitol for today's inaugural event. >> she joins us live via telephone and tell our viewers where you are on the mall and what's it like what's the atmosphere li
, beverly mckinney sees living proof of dr. king's dream realized. >> you as an individual have the opportunity to make a difference in this world. if you don't do that, it was all nor naught. >> reporter: a message these former southern californians say has inspired own family. their son won the presidential award for academics and a trip they hope will stay with him forever. >> i tell my son, strive for the best, maybe you could be the first hispanic. >> and christin ayers is in washington for this morning's inaugural event. >> and she joins us by the phone from the national mall where the stage is set and security is mighty tight as well. good morning, give us your impressions. you've been there i would imagine several hours so far just going through security and whatnot, right. >> reporter: that's right, we have been here for hours and security is tight. we stood in line for about 3 1/2 hours trying to get through a media entrance and were later let through along with the rest of the general public. a chilly morning standing out and wait
just one man, dr. king made an extraordinary difference in all of our lives. and while he himself was silent, his dream lives on and serves as an inspiration that one person can make a difference. mr. kildee: dr. king reminds me the strikers of the 1930's in my hometown who also stood up to the injustices that they saw. their efforts helped create the labor movement and made our country a better place, as did dr. king. mr. speaker, no matter our political differences, we can all unite on monday to fulfill dr. king's dream. this martin luther king day, let's honor the man who continues to inspire us all. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from-month seek recognition? mr. daines: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from montana is recognized for one minute. mr. daines: mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize alexus wineman. this 18-year-old from cut bank, montana, represents my state as miss montana and she recently made
and also, of the bay is recognizing and honoring the late dr. martin luther king jr.. look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. you're only 14 and a half. he doesn't have back problems. you kids have got it too good if you ask me. [ male announcer ] now u-verse high speed internet has more speed options, reliability and ways to connect. rethink possible. >> dr. marcham of 13, americans across the bay are honoring the civil rights leader played a significant role in advancing american rights, human rights for nonviolence in civil disobedience. until his assassination in 1968. thousands of people, the tributes started with a train ride. this was the annual fee o freedom train. he played a significant roleamerican rights through non-violence, and civil disobedience in the
assessment -- martin luther king, jr. [applause] so the president will clearly be in the foreground, but dr. king looms large as the backdrop. now, word comes from the white house that they will use his bible for this historic and iconic celebration, so we will talk tonight about how we honor the legacy of dr. king by focusing more attention on the issue that he gave his life for -- the poor. king once said we have to civilize ourselves by the immediate abolition of poverty. obviously, we are not quite there yet, but we of tonight's conversation will aid us and of that as in trying to make sure that we look out for the least among us. i am pleased tonight to be joined by an all-star panel. i want to introduce them one by one and jumped right into the conversation. i want to start by thanking c- span for carrying this program live around the world tonight. [applause] thank you, c-span. as the conversation gets under way, we will tell you more about what you can do at home or wherever you might be watching tonight to join in the conversation, but for now, let me introduce the novice panel of
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